Premier Stelmach, Alberta’s bears hope you’ll do the right thing

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Alberta Wilderness Association

Dear Premier Stelmach:

We need your help to save the last 691 grizzly bears in Alberta. And, since natural habitats flow across boundaries, what you do to (or on behalf of) the bears in the Castle Wilderness impacts the bears in Waterton Lakes as well as in Glacier National Park.

Unless the Alberta Government makes a serious commitment to protecting habitat, the grizzlies have no chance of survival.

Many of the steps to save these bears have little cost. For example, the Province could close or restrict remote roads, trails and seismic lines which have outlived their purpose and have no economic benefit.

It’s not just a problem of grizzlies, as magnificent and symbolic as they are to us. The disappearance of bears reflects a problem with the whole eco-system. Other species are severely threatened in Alberta because the Province has not taken care of its wild lands and wild life.

You have said that “nothing is more important than protecting the land we’ve inherited”. I hope, Mr. Premier, you will act on this conviction.

There was a time when Alberta was committed to conservation. You have the opportunity to restore a conservation ethic in the life of Alberta and leave a proud and profound legacy.

Yours truly,

Malcolm R. Campbell
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2 responses

  1. I think the Canadians did pretty well in protecting the North Flathead drainage, but other than that they seem quite anti-environment lately. Got to keep trying though!

    • There’s been a lot of pressure in Alberta from mining and logging interests. About 20 years ago, when I was a member of the Glacier area’s North Fork Preservation group, the largest battle was the proposed Cabin Creek Mine. Ultimately, the provisions of the Boundary Waters Treaty stopped that one.

      On the plus side, there has been more talk about expanding Wateron Lakes Park westward. Maybe that will happen some day.

      Malcolm