What the hell is Florida Power Thinking?

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While the heading of this post is mine, the story comes from the National Parks and Conservation Association:

Everglades National Park…home to the largest wilderness area east of the Rockies; home to the largest protected mangrove ecosystem in the western hemisphere; and home to 68 federally threatened and endangered species. 

Does this sound like a place for giant towers puncturing the landscape with multiple power lines stretching as far as the eye can see? We don’t think so either.

The National Park Service is currently accepting public comment on a proposal that would allow Florida Power and Light (FPL) to build massive transmission lines through Everglades National Park. The use is completely incompatible with the designated purpose of the Everglades, and it is therefore necessary that FPL find an alternative route. Taxpayers are the rightful owners of America’s national parks, like the Everglades. Conveying a track of Everglades National Park–also a U.S. World Heritage Site–to a for-profit utility for a transmission lines corridor poses a threat to the Everglades ecosystem and conflicts with long-term restoration efforts. This is definitely not the way to treat a World Heritage Site.

Take Action: Submit your comments to Everglades Superintendent Dan Kimball and tell him that Everglades and all national parks are owned by the American people and are not for power lines.

Growing up in Florida, I learned that “swamps” were often simply tolerated as junk land that needed to be fixed in some way. In the panhandle, Tate’s Hell swamp was logged to death while the natural flow of the water was dammed up with the logging roads. In south Florida, the Everglades is constantly under threat due to water and air quality issues, invasive species and the sprawl of nearby cities. Power lines through the swamp are another one of the many insults.

Let’s try to stop them from being built.

See also, a new threat to the Grand Canyon in House Funding Bill Reverses Policy to Protect Grand Canyon

Malcolm

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This short introduction to Glacier National Park’s Swiftcurrent Valley will delight, entertain, and offer a glimpse into the dramatic history of the most beautiful place on Earth… or so many visitors claim!

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3 responses

  1. You are certainly right about this. We are facing growing efforts to exploit all of our wild lands, parks wilderness and roadless areas in the name of “progress”. We will either somehow stop that trend or face the extinction of our species. It will stop either way: I hope the species decides on the better route.

    • Meanwhile, there’s a new threat to Grand Canyon as a rider on a House of Representatives funding bill seeks to undo a moratorium that protects the park and the river from uranium mining contamination. It’s always something, always a new outrage and a new petition and a new battle somewhere. Sometimes I want to ask what the hell are all of us thinking?